Joseph B

Black Panther is Undocumented

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Joseph B

Unionville, MO

When I moved to the US one the first things I was told to do was to make an American Dream. I was told that if I believed in myself, kept on track and especially work hard I could accomplish my dream. That I could accomplish anything. Because America is the Land of Opportunity.

So I made my American Dream to become a doctor. Not just any doctor. But a good doctor. T

his would show people that my hard work and drive was worth it and that I could repay my parents for bringing me here. Now I’m a sophomore in High School and my American Dream has never been as more driven. I’ve taken the hardest classes I can. I started tutoring kids, applying for scholarships anywhere and everywhere, and now I’m writing for my local newspaper as a freelance reporter. In my opinion, my definition of “American” is first of all having a American Dream.

Something you can work at and once you achieve, be grateful and be an inspiration to others working at theirs. Why this is so important to me is that I go to a small rural school where racial diversity is almost non-existant. In a high school of around 200 kids the only non-whites are me and my older sister.

When I graduate I really want to be able to leave my town and do something great with my life that kids back in my small town will have inspiration to be able to do something great as well. This is what I believe it means to “American.” That dream that every immigrant makes for themselves is the epitome of pure American.

To want to strive in a country of great opportunity, to be able to pick do something great regardless of whatever country you’re from. Now as I’m getting closer to my dream I can’t wait to finally achieve it. In a couple months I have an obstacle I must get over before I can ever get to my American dream and that is I’m going to court. I’ve lived in the US since I was 5 and I’ve been living in this country for 10 years.

I’m finally going to immigration court with my family to see if we qualify for permanent residence. It’s been a long road but it couldn’t get any closer. My skin maybe tan, my hair maybe black and my eyes maybe asian. But deep in my heart I know exactly that I’m an American.

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